Anonymous India Attacks TRAI After Leaking One Million Petitioners Email Accounts

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The Indian division of the hacker collective, Anonymous, attacked the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) taking the site offline with a massive Distributed-Denial-of-Service (DDoS) Attack. Anonymous India took the site offline after the TRAI had made millions of pro net neutrality petitioners email IDs public.

Anonymous India (AnonOpsIndia) made a barrage of tweets claiming responsibility for taking trai.gov.in offline, warning the domain would soon be hacked.

A little over a month ago, the TRAI released a consultation paper with twenty questions about Net Neutrality that Indian citizens were to send in via email by April 24. The paper overviewed citizens thoughts on Net Neutrality and their stance on the subject. The response was overwhelming, with over 1.1 million emails being sent to the TRAI in just under two weeks.

TRAI’s plan was to allow telecom providers in India to begin blocking or slowing websites and applications in hopes of extorting more money from businesses as well as consumers, which is a violation of Net Neutrality. The idea that all of the net remains neutral, meaning there are no Internet fast lanes for businesses who wish the pay the telecom companies more.

However, after TRAI collected all the submissions from the SavetheInternet campaign, the company leaked all of the some one million users who submitted their responses on net neutrality. The leak of over one million emails is a goldmine for hackers and spammers.

Not only did the TRAI leak millions of email ID’s, they went on to publish the respective responses from the citizens. The company divided the responses into three separate categories:

  1. Comments from Service Providers
  2. Comments from Service Providers Association
  3. Comments from other Stakeholders

Anonymous India sent out a series of tweets with their motive and fight for Internet freedom throughout India.

If you were one of the over million submissions who sent an email to TRAI anytime within the past month, your email likely got leaked. Meaning you will presumably get a flood of spam emails from advertisers, hackers, and most importantly phishers. Be on the lookout for phishing emails.

Meanwhile, the TRAI had denied any hacking claims, stating the official TRAI website was offline “due to some technical glitches.”

About Author

Brandon Stosh is the founder and CEO of www.freedomhacker.net. Stosh is a cyber security researcher and professional consultant who strives to provide reliable news on cyber-security based topics.

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